the language of yoga: karma.

The Language of Yoga: Karma

The language of yoga: karma.

“Karma-a-a!” the teacher hollered across the pre-school classroom.  I looked up, expectantly, wondering: what the hell happened?  A little girl in wearing a backwards purple shirt and Pebbles Flinstone hair rushed past me, rushing to hug the teacher’s knees. The teacher wasn’t yelling “karma” in exasperation as I expected… she was calling the name of an adorable pre-schooler with an under bite.  Seriously?  Seriously.  Someone named her little girl Karma.  Oh dear God, I thought… What an unlucky name.  Or, wait, maybe it’s a really lucky name.  Was this Karma a good karma or a bad karma consequence?  

Karma is probably the most-used and least-understood concept in the Yoga philosophy.  Its meanings are many, and do in fact, vary across Religious traditions.  (e.g. ‘karma’ means something different in Buddhism than in Taoism.)  A few months ago, I stumbled across this article which explains the Sanskrit term of Karma.  It isn’t exhaustive, but it’s a good place to start… and it may inspire you to re-think the next time you pull out the old shrug-and-sing ‘karma’ when your friend gets a parking ticket.

This article is re-posted from Yoga Glo.  Its original format can be found here.  Written by Alice G. Walton, PhD

Karma may be one of the most colloquialized expressions from the yogic tradition, and unfortunately it’s also one of the most misunderstood. It originally comes from the Sanskrit word “karman,” whose root “kri” means simply “to do” – no morality or ethics implied. In fact, Karma itself is usually just translated as “to act.” But we tend to think of it as having more significant undertones, with god or fate in there as a mediator between action and consequence. And this is actually not so close to the original meaning, which is much more straightforward.

Maren Showkeir, who co-authored the book Yoga Wisdom at Work, points out how misinterpreted the word often can often be today. “I think people get really confused about Karma,” she says. “Many people have the misconception that it’s about the Universe or the Cosmos or even god rewarding/punishing based on actions we take.” It’s not about this at all, she says, and there’s no third party judging or orchestrating the actions we do.

Karma is just about what happens in the world after we take action of any kind – and the fact that our actions do have consequences, though we may not always be aware of what they are. “It’s nothing more than the connection between action and consequence,” she says. “That is always neutral. It’s our perceptions and judgments that label ‘good and bad.’” Some have pointed out that it’s really just as basic as Newton’s third law of motion (“for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction”). And if we can get on board with this simplicity, we’ll understand the essence of Karma pretty well.

The problem is that we’re not always aware of how our actions will affect others, so there’s always some element of unknowing – and this can give way to the feeling that there must be another force at play. “We can’t really shape karma because we can never know the consequences of our actions,” says Showkeir, “which may be why people want to chalk it up to ‘the universe.’ However, we can be mindful about the actions we take.”

In other words, it’s about keeping intention, rather than consequence, in mind as we decide on our actions. There’s no guarantee, of course, but we can hope that decisions that come from a place of kindness will – in most cases – end in positive results. Showkeir agrees that for her, “the challenge is to try not to get too hung up on the potential consequences. If I act with the assumption/expectation that if I do X, we’ll get Y positive result, I am setting myself up for disappointment. The thing that drives my actions is my intention, and that is where the focus belongs. It is a fine distinction, but in my mind, an essential one.”

Acting from a place of intention frees you up to make better decisions, because you’re not overwhelmed – or worse, paralyzed – by all the potential outcomes. In those cases, like Showkeir says, your brain sort of shuts down because it’s impossible to predict the future. But acting with the assumption that good intentions usually lead to good outcomes is a lot more logical and a lot more liberating. “We can recognize that we are responsible for the consequences of our actions,” says Showkeir. “And that will lead to more peace.”

Alice G. Walton, PhD is a health and science writer, and began practicing (and falling in love with) yoga last year. She is the Associate Editor at TheDoctorWillSeeYouNow.com and a Contributor at Forbes.com. Alice will be exploring yoga’s different styles, history, and philosophy, and sharing what she learns here on the YogaGlo blog. You can follow Alice on Twitter @AliceWalton and Facebook at Facebook.com/alicegwalton.

This article is re-posted from Yoga Glo.  Its original format can be found here.

happy spring.

To celebrate the first day of Spring in the Northern Hemisphere, get yourself outdoors and reflect on the wonder of nature.  This poem, taken from Mary Oliver’s West Wind, is the perfect inspiration.  Breathe in the promise of newness.  Open your hands to the world.

Spring.      by Mary Oliver
“This morning
two birds
fell down the side of the maple tree
like a tuft of fire
a wheel of fire
a love knot
out of control as they plunged through the air
pressed against each other
and I thought
how I meant to live a quiet life
how I meant to live a life of mildness and meditation
tapping the careful words against each other
and I thought—
as though I were suddenly spinning like a bar of silver
as though I had shaken my arms and lo! they were wings—
of the Buddha
when he rose from the green garden
when he rose in his powerful ivory body
when it turned to the long dusty road without end
when he covered his hairs with ribbons and the petals of flowers
when he opened his hands to the world.”
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What is your favorite thing about spring?  How will you greet the freshness of this season?

Looking forward to your thoughts.

-lisa