why writing is better than talking. (don’t miss this new 6 week class!)

Nothing has helped me achieve greater clarity and healing than daily Writing Meditation.

Chatting with my friends and my Life Coach Julie Edge is great, of course, and definitely better than talking to myself all the time. (Perspective, right?) But daily Writing Meditation is 10 times better; because when my thoughts crystallize into written words, patterns that I couldn’t see in the swirling of my internal monologue become clear.

The first few minutes of pen-to-paper writing is really the surface excavation: I’m dumping and scooping and sweeping dirt aside to get down to the next level. The “next level” is when I get courageous enough to write down the thoughts that I would never say aloud to anyone.

Because, they are totally and completely ridiculously untrue — but they are unconscious assumptions and are actually holding me back. Research shows that the practice of journaling and writing meditation reduces stress, help us process grief and promotes healthy expression of emotion.

When it comes to writing meditation, I’ve found that the more I do it, the easier it gets.

Writing meditation helps me identify the the mental habits and limiting beliefs that are swirling around in my mind, making it all muddy and gunky. And then it helps me clear it all off, clean up my mind and take a deep breath.

Eventually, I’ll write something down— often hidden in between sentences of confusion or worry or scheming or totally random thoughts— that just makes everything clear. I’ll read it and think: “Oh now, THAT’S valuable insight. That is a gem.”

Join me for this 6 week course: Writing to Wholeness, to learn how daily writing meditation can unleash you from long-held mental habits and beliefs that are gunking up your life.

with Julie Edge and Lisa Ash Drackert

Sundays September 23, October 7, October 21, 2018

4:00- 5:30 pm @ Westport Yoga KC

Learn how to build and sustain a daily writing meditation practice in this exclusive 6-week course.

The Writing-to-Wholeness Workshop includes:

  • 6 weeks of daily writing prompts delivered via text
  • 3 in-person class sessions held at Westport Yoga KC
  • a custom tailored journal
  • weekly e-mails with writing tips and encouragement to support your practice
  • continuous online support from facilitators Julie Edge and Lisa Ash Drackert
  • complimentary tea and water during in-person meeting sessions
  • complimentary attendance of the Yin Yoga class immediately following in-person gatherings
  • 10% off all retail purchases at Westport Yoga KC during the duration of your course

Writing meditation is a daily practice blending the art of writing with spiritual development. Similar to journaling, writing meditation practice provides a safe place for emotional release and of ‘letting go’ of thoughts. However, different than journaling, writing meditation is not meant to capture the day’s activities or to solve a specific problem. It’s a free writing method that offers a way to observe thoughts and emotion in a judgement-free zone. This class will be led by Julie Edge of Inside Edge Coaching and Lisa Ash Drackert of Westport Yoga KC.

Learn more here: www.insideedgecoach.com/writing-workshop

Investment: $95  Registration Opens July 18

e-mail me to get on the Wait List– I have one 15% off discount code for the first person on the Wait List!

i appreciate you scooting over.

I haven’t been able to write much lately, not because I haven’t made time, but because I haven’t made space.

Like the genius warrior/writer Glennon Doyle Melton, reading is my inhale and writing is my exhale. I’ve been inhaling everything I can get my hands on for the past two months: self-help books, leadership books, spirituality books, yoga books, chick-lit-Savannah-wedding books, don’t-send-your-business- down-the-drain books. I’ve been inhaling so long and so deeply, I haven’t taken one exhale in months. Do you know how awesome it feels to be so full of breath that your eyes are popping out of your head and your lungs are Blimping it to anywhere but here? There is no space. There is absolutely no grace or conscious awareness or invitation for emotional healing when I hold my breath for two months straight. And definitely no space for writing about it.

In Sanskrit, the idea of space is defined by one little syllable: “kha.”

In the Yoga Sutras, we learn early on that the whole idea of yoga is to teach humans to mindfully breathe their way from duhkha, suffering, (literally: Bad Space) toward sukhaSafe Space.

In yoga practice, we discover sukha almost immediately. We learn that we find sukha through releasing physical pain, tension and fatigue with yoga poses that stretch and open our bodies. We learn that we feel a sense of sweet serenity when we finally trust our yoga mat enough to hold us safely in final relaxation pose, savasana.

And we also learn about Bad Space, suffering (duhkha), very early on in our yoga practice. We learn that pushing ourselves into a pose is a very, very bad idea because we wind up so sore we can only waddle the next day. We learn that holding the breath beyond the natural inhale and the natural exhale brings us face to face with our aversions, our desires, our addictions, our cravings. We learn that the mind will trick us into duhkha with its infinite configurations of distractions and illusions and lies, yelling things like: ‘You have no business being here! Get out now while you still can—before all the perfectly-clothed-bendy-peppy people in this room figure out you’re a big giant faker!

Being in a Safe Space versus a Bad Space is a big deal. It feels like the difference between being a weirdo robot about go berserk and being a real-life functioning person. It feels like the difference between crouching in a dank dark hole and cart-wheeling through a brilliantly sun-drenched glade. It feels like the difference between filling myself with more and more and more and more, still unable fill the void of yearning in my heart, no matter how much I fill it with, and being a person who can sit with herself in silence and actually enjoy it. It feels like the difference between living through the days and actually LIVING LIFE.

And here’s the thing: practicing yoga doesn’t prevent suffering in life—it doesn’t, actually, (even though I really want it to) prevent really crappy things from happening. Practicing yoga doesn’t earn me a free pass from turmoil; it just teaches me how to lead my thoughts away from a continuous loop of turmoil and get my head into a Safe Space where I can find sukha, relief, sweetness.

Over the next few posts I want to explore the concept of kha; what it looks like and feels like to find spaciousness in our lives.

I’m finally ready to explore exactly what kind of kha I’ve been hiding in the past few months as I’ve transitioned from yoga teacher to business owner, left my Ashtanga Yoga home and shepherded a community of grieving students through the loss of our former owner and the change in leadership at Westport Yoga.

I’m finally ready to exhale my way into the spaciousness of sweet, forgiving, Soulful living… and since writing is my exhale, I suppose I’m inviting you along for the ride. I appreciate you scooting over and making space for my Blimp-sized emotional exhale.

-lisa

 

why you should write down your blessings.

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So, glass Ball Jars are super trendy right now. Totally ‘hipstipod old 001 (46)er chic.’  I have a million of them in my home.  Not because I’m trendy… but because I’ve recently been nerding out about the possible dangers of plastic and also I inherited 5 boxes of glass jars from my Grandma, who was an avid ‘canner’. (I made that word up… but you know what I mean.  She loved to can green beans, apple butter, peaches, etc.)

I’m using them for everything: bulk dry goods storage, water glasses, spare change holders, holiday decorations, bobby pin containers, you name it.

I’ve found a new use for the beautiful, homey, endearing glassware: Blessing Jars.  Like you, I’m great at starting a new ‘life-changing’ habit in January– writing in a Gratitude Journal, or charting my daily water intake, or recording the minutes I spend walking during the day.  And then, of course, the paper get tucked away in my files and I remember it again in June when I’m cleaning out my desk.  Perfect.

Despite my inability to maintain a routine of writing things down for the sake of accountability, I think the act of writing words on paper is decisively powerful.  When you write things down, energy becomes action.  I recently read this article which taught me that the act of writing leads to physical and mental health benefits including:

  • improved mood and sense of well-being
  • decreased stress and anxiety levels
  • lower blood pressure
  • better memory and sleep.

All of these sound like winners.  Yes, please.  Writing is good for you and is one small habit that can lead to a life filled with happiness and health (similar to eating more veggies–try my celery and pear slaw– and getting more exercise- try my yoga classes!)

New Year’s Resolutions are difficult to keep. Remember this post?  Don’t make this a resolution.  Make this a 30 second challenge for your health and your happiness.

Find a small piece of paper.  Write done ONE thing that is a blessing to you and put it in a glass jar.  Do this every day.  Or just whenever you remember.  As the days go by, your glass jar will quietly fill.  One day, you’ll look at it, and realize that your life, like your jar, is FULL of BLESSINGS.

“We are cups, constantly and quietly being filled. The trick is, knowing how to tip ourselves over and let the beautiful stuff out.”  – ray bradbury

Cheers to being full.

Happy writing,

-lisa